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F31 Archaeology South-East, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Archaeology South-East started life as the Institute of Archaeology’s Field Archaeology Unit in the early 1970s. The first purpose of the Field Unit was to train students during the Institute’s field schools in Sussex whilst working on staff research projects in the area.

The unit soon became involved in publicly funded ‘Rescue’ archaeology, becoming the regional unit responsible for the archaeology of Sussex. As the 'Sussex Archaeological Field Unit' it undertook a series of important field projects in the 1980s (including work at Boxgrove Quarry, Roman villas at Bignor and Barcombe, and on the Brighton By-pass).

In the 1990s the unit became increasingly involved in commercially funded projects. Operating as 'Archaeology South-East', and re-structured to meet the exacting standards of the private-sector we have become one of the largest and most effective contract archaeology teams working in Southern England. By 2012 the team had completed nearly 3000 commercial projects for a wide variety of clients.

In May 2013 Archaeology South-East was expanded to absorb the former Essex County Council Field Archaeology Unit, involving the transfer of all staff, projects and facilities. The Essex County Unit had, like its Sussex counterpart, been involved in rescue and contract archaeology since the 1970s. The transferring staff had been responsible for a string of major archaeological projects throughout East Anglia, such as the excavation of the Roman towns at Heybridge and Chelmsford.

F31 Archaeology South-East, UCL Institute of Archaeology

Around the open track

F31 Around the Ancient Track

£35.00

Description

Around the Ancient Track: Archaeological Excavations for the Brighton and Hove Waste Water Treatment Works and adjacent housing at Peacehaven, East Sussex

This volume presents the findings of a series of large-scale excavations to the north-east of Peacehaven, East Sussex. The excavations amounted to some 36.2 hectares and provided a rare opportunity to examine prehistoric and Roman land-use in the South Downs on an unprecedented scale. Key findings include a large group of Early Neolithic pits, an extensive Later Neolithic and Early Bronze Age monumental landscape, Middle Bronze Age settlement, Later Bronze Age field systems and a rare D-shaped building, Iron Age buildings and enclosure system, and an early Roman farmstead.
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Alien Cities

F31 Alien Cities: Consumption and the origins of urbanism in Roman Britain

£35.00

Description

This book examines the economic and social impact of early Roman towns on the landscape of south-east Britain. Utilising the unusually rich database generated by rescue excavations in the region dominated by Colchester and London, it asks how the creation of these cities affected rural landscapes and communities in the first 200 years of Roman administration and control. In addressing these questions the authors hope to give impulse to improvements in the ways that archaeological data are collected, described and disseminated. The methodological focus of the volume involves comparing the evidence for past patterns of consumption, as represented by archaeological finds assemblages from urban and rural sites – comprising coins, pottery, animal bones and other artefacts.
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Excavations on St Anne's Hill

F31 Excavations on St Anne’s Hill.

£35.00

Description

A Middle/Late Iron Age site and Anglo-Saxon cemetery at St Anne’s Road, Eastbourne, East Sussex.

Archaeological investigations, undertaken in 1997 and 1998, revealed further evidence of an important multi-period site located on the crest and south-east-facing slope of St Anne’s Hill, Eastbourne, East Sussex
Around 100 Middle/Late Iron Age storage pits were uncovered: many more than any other non-hillfort site in Sussex and with evidence that grain processing as well as storage may have been carried out at the site. Almost certainly connected are secondary religious offerings deposited within the pits. Soon after the Roman conquest there was a major reorganisation of the landscape with a new field-system and trackway, perhaps as a result of the foundation of villa estates in the area. In the 5th century an Early Anglo-Saxon cemetery was established on the hill, with 193 graves and 11 urned cremations recorded during these excavations. These ranged in date from the 5th and 6th centuries to the 7th century and the accompanying grave goods suggest a community mixed in character.

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Flavian & Later Buildings at Snodland Roman Villa

F31 Flavian and later buildings at Snodland Roman villa: excavations at Cantium Way, Snodland, Kent

£20.00

Description

Following the discovery of a hoard of 3600 Roman coins, a large-scale excavation was undertaken to the west of the main Snodland villa, at the interface between outer buildings and agricultural land. A series of field systems and pits, as well as a distinctive concentric building with masonry foundations, timber buildings, and a small cemetery were uncovered. The large assemblages of material culture and ecofacts are presented including significant Neronian building material from an unlocated bath house.
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UCLOS

F31 Late Quaternary Human Activity in the Darent Valley at Lullingstone Country Park, Eynsford, Kent

£10.00

Description

Between 2009 and 2011, Archaeology South-East carried out a series of excavations and watching briefs in advance of development at the Lullingstone Country Park, near Eynsford, Kent. The work, commissioned by Kent County Council, revealed a deep sequence of Pleistocene and Holocene slope deposits in the Darent river valley. Key findings include a rich cluster of refitting Terminal Upper Palaeolithic flint artefacts characteristic of Lateglacial hunter-gatherer ‘longblade’ cultures and a more diffuse spread of Early Mesolithic flintwork, including microliths, as part of a preserved land surface.
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Living by the Sword

F31 Living by the sword: the archaeology of Brisley Farm, Ashford, Kent

£35.00

Description

This volume presents the findings of ten archaeological sites investigated at Brisley Farm, Chilmington Green and nearby site, ChristChurch CE High School, Ashford, Kent, excavated between 1998 and 2009. Evidence for activity ranges from the Mesolithic through to the early post-medieval periods, with a focus on the development from a Bronze Age through to medieval landscape. At its height, in the Late Iron Age, Brisley Farm was the focus for an exceptional settlement including ritual elements and two internationally significant warrior burials, which are the latest known from Britain.
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